Monday, 14 February 2011

A Tiger Called Broken Tail - Natural World

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Tuesday 15th February.
7pm on BBC Two

If there is one animal I would love to see in the wild it is the Tiger - Panthera tigris. I've spent some time tracking them with my friends Kalyan and Mandanna in India (Poo, Pee & Pugmarks) but sadly I never saw one myself. It's no suprise that they're difficult to see as they are superbly cryptic animals, mysterious and elusive, but more significantly they are also severly endangered. While India has the worlds largest tiger population, and the most active conservation projects, they have still declined by 60% since the 1990s - mostly due to illegal poaching. Now only 1,400 survive in highly protected reserves, and only 11% of their original habitat remains. This weeks Natural World comes straight from the heart of a cameraman, Colin Stafford-Johnson, and explores his relationship with the animals that he has spent many years filming. 'A Tiger Called Broken Tail' follows Colin and his soundman, Salim, as they piece together the final days of a tiger cub they call Broken Tail. After leaving his sanctuary and going on the run, he survived for almost a year in the unprotected badlands of rural Rajasthan. Through Broken Tail's story Colin and Salim uncover stark truths about India's last wild tigers.

- Paul Williams
Find out more on the BBC programme page



(Photo: BBC)

3 comments:

  1. looks great ! love the photography and video footage . Hopefully the demand for tiger parts will decrease, with China and SE Asia looking to modernize and locals in the regions can live in peace with the tigers . These magnificent animals must flourish and survive !

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  2. A heart breaking story, the love for this animal shows how special these creatures are

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  3. What an amazing program, I have been completely absorbed by this documentary and with the presenter who clearly has an infectious love of tigers, life and this Planet Earth. Thank you very much BBC.

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