Sunday, 1 April 2012

BBC Natural World uncovers the secret life of the last Tree Octopus

Please click here to comment
The Last Tree Octopus, Thursday, BBC2, 8pm.

Extremely elusive and highly endangered, the tree octopus was almost wiped out in the early 20th century when a passion for hats ornamented with cephalopod accoutrements fuelled widespread hunting. Even today octopus numbers remain below the critical level for successful reproduction. 

For the first time a team of scientists are uncovering the fate of this once common cephalopod in the temperate rainforest of North West America. Here the high humidity, and up to 6 metres of rain a year, protect the remaining tree octopi from desiccation, but to survive they need regular access to their spawning streams. Habitat loss and new roads impede their migration routes, but the biggest threat comes from introduced house cats who have developed a taste for arboreal calamari. Can this peculiar species be saved?

Using the latest camera technology The Natural World brings you the secret life of the tree octopus, like you've never seen it before!


"Filming this species required many hours stuck up a tree but eventually we were able to witness the most intimate behaviours between a pair of courting Octopi, before the male led the female down the tree" - Rich Conhoax, Cameraman

Cameraman's eye view of a courting male tree octopus (Photo)

Tree Octopus heading for the spawning waterways (Photo)

Predation of the rare tree Octopus (Photo: Galen Leeds) 

Predation of the rare tree Octopus (Photo: Galen Leeds) 

During filming the crew has an unexpected encounter with a large tree octopus. (Photo)


Early 20th century advertisement for the latest hat fashion 

Also find out about the Australian Drop Bear at the Australian Museum


The Giant Pacific Octopus

You might think that the tree octopus is difficult to study ;-) but have you met it's cousin - the giant Pacific octopus? Scientists from Alaska Pacific University have been tracking this elusive creature in the North Pacific. BBC Photo Gallery: http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/17561456


The giant pacific octopus (Photo: D Scheel)


PLEASE NOTE: THIS IS AN APRIL FOOLS JOKE!


24 comments:

  1. Wow! I never tire of learning about things like this, and being a prospective resident of the Pacific Northwest makes it all the more fascinating!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks Paul for this post and was not aware of octopus living on trees. Good knowledge and education provided :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. http://zapatopi.net/treeoctopus/

    ReplyDelete
  4. Are you serious?!?!? This is faker than a thirteen dollar bill!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  5. The world is full of gullible people. I can freeze and post this rare octopus anywhere in the world for $1000 a piece. :)

    ReplyDelete
  6. this is bullshit

    ReplyDelete
  7. It says April fools

    ReplyDelete
  8. I am currently not sure what to think of this "octopus in a tree" I want to believe this but some how the whole an octopus living in a tree thing just doesn't seem right to me but that is just me. *・゜゚・*:.。..。.:*・'(*゚▽゚*)'・*:.。. .。.:*・゜゚・*

    ReplyDelete
  9. bullll crapp

    ReplyDelete
  10. Wow, This is faker then a monkey then a money being the captian of an airplain and talking.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Hey, This is so not real ....... When pigs fly and cats go scuba diving then come back to me :Z

    ReplyDelete
  12. this is so not real! like guys there is a new tree species tree shark lol!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  13. snow angles are in the ocean eating sand apples

    ReplyDelete
  14. Hey there is also a mixed species.... Tree Octoshark!

    ReplyDelete
  15. stpo it haley

    ReplyDelete
  16. stop putting fake stuff on the internet u nerds

    ReplyDelete
  17. this is not real!!!

    ReplyDelete